An Adventure A Day

Because "life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all" – Helen Keller

Friday Fotos: A collection of favorites

March 31, 2017


Here are a few of the most recent photos I’ve posted on Instagram. Most of them are various spots around Rome, with one exception – the beautiful Citadel Park in Copenhagen.

For some reason, I find that Rome is easier to capture in photographs than it is in words. Perhaps it’s the long history, or the complex character of the city and its many Riones, or maybe it’s the sheer variety of people that call the eternal city home. Whatever it is, I’ll continue to try and capture the elusive spirit of the city that I call home, for now.

 

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Seeking Green Spaces – Friday Fotos on Saturday

March 25, 2017


Every now and again, you just need to get out of the city.

Every now and again,  I crave more country than the parks of Rome can provide. Fortunately for me, skirting the border of the city is a surprising amount of beautiful farmland. The gently rolling hills of Lazio bear a closer resemblance to the famed hills of Tuscany than the fabled seven hills of Rome.

In these wide swaths of green space, you’re more likely to encounter a tractor than a Vespa, and the traffic – well, sheep may be your biggest problem here.

One overcast afternoon, we needed a break from the city. A short 15 minute drive and we were at a quaint family run Agritourismo, for a delicious organic lunch.  We remained for a while after we finished eating and let the children frolic in the green fields, just soaking in the pastoral beauty – with the Roman skyline in the distance.

Head on over to the Daily Post for more Green.

 

 

Adventure sometimes comes in the most unexpected of places. I enjoy exploring alone. When I’m alone, I don’t need to worry about keeping pace with anyone, or going off schedule, or charging in and trying something new. Sometimes I find a view that takes my breath away. Sometimes I’ll have an interesting conversation. Sometimes I’ll …

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Friday Fotos: The Road Taken – The Appia Antica

March 3, 2017


In its heyday, the Appia Antica ran from the Roman Forum to Brindisi a port town on the coast of what is today Southern Puglia. Construction on the road began in 312 BC under the censor Appius Claudis Caecus and was completed in 244 BC. While much of the original 350 miles (563km) are gone, within the Parco Regionale Dell’Appia Antica remnants of the original road survive to this day.

The Appia Antica is one of my favorite places to explore. Although it is just to the south of the city, the park seems like another world, where you’re as likely to encounter sheep and horses as you are cars, bicycles and joggers.

Along the way, you’ll stumble across churches, catacombs, tombs and homes – both currently occupied and ancient ruins, like the Complesso di Massenzio. On this enormous complex, that was once the site of the emperor’s villa, you can run along the remains of a giant circus and explore the eerily silent tomb of his son Romulus.

Not far from the Complesso you’ll find one of the most recognizable symbols of the Appian Antica – the tomb of Cecelia. This tomb is thought to have been built for either the wife or daughter-in-law of Marcus Crassus, a contemporary of Julius Caesar. The tomb of Seneca, the Catacombs of San Callisto and San Sebastiano, and the spot where St Peter encountered Jesus in what is now the Church Domine quo Vadis are just a few of the incredible monuments you’ll encounter on your journey. The information center at Via Appia Antica 58/60 is very helpful and offers free maps as well as maps to purchase. You can find an interactive map on the official Appia Antica Website.

The atmosphere of the Appian Way is spectacular. You’ll find yourself transported through the ages as you stand among the same stones that the figures you’ve read about in your history books traveled on over the centuries.

I find it amazing that many of the original stones are still in the ground. In places, they are intermixed with modern cobblestones, but they remain. Etched deeply in places with continued use, but through everything, they are there still.

I have not tried to get there by public transportation, but you can visit the park by bus. The 118, 218 and 660 bus lines all have stops on the Via Appia Antica. If you wish to plan your trip by bus,  I find MouversiRoma and Google Maps to be great help when I travel by public transportation in Rome.

Stop by the DailyPost and see what others have found on their journey down the road taken.