An Adventure A Day

Because "life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all" – Helen Keller

Friday Fotos: Earth

April 21, 2017


Spring in Germany is a glorious time of year. The well-tended gardens are beginning to blossom, the trees are beginning to flower and the window boxes are beginning to bloom. The entire countryside is awash in color. One of our favorite things on earth is exploring the German countryside in the Spring. In Germany the paths are well-marked and well-groomed, and a perfect place to spend a beautiful spring day, basking in the warmth and beauty of the earth.

“We need the tonic of wildness…At the same time that we are earnest to explore and learn all things, we require that all things be mysterious and unexplorable, that land and sea be indefinitely wild, unsurveyed and unfathomed by us because unfathomable. We can never have enough of nature.”   Henry David Thoreau

This week WordPress is taking a look at Earth you can find other interpretations here.

In the past year, I’ve made it a point of going out on my own and exploring Rome. Sometimes I only managed one or two outings a month, and other times I’ve managed an outing each week. I’ve revisited new shows in museums and churches I’d visited in the past, and discovered many more along the …

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The Aventine Hill is the southernmost of Rome’s seven hills. It is a peaceful residential area that seems a world away from the bustle of other areas of Rome. I began my exploration at Terme Caracalla, located just to the south of the Circus Maximus on the Caelian Hill. The enormous ruins housed a public bath …

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My Relationship with Italy Lately I’ve been thinking about my relationship with Italy. For me, it was not a case of love at first sight. In fact, it’s often seemed more of a wary acceptance that has more or less developed into a comfortable coexistence. As I try to piece together my complicated relationship with this beautiful, …

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Friday Fotos: A collection of favorites

March 31, 2017


Here are a few of the most recent photos I’ve posted on Instagram. Most of them are various spots around Rome, with one exception – the beautiful Citadel Park in Copenhagen.

For some reason, I find that Rome is easier to capture in photographs than it is in words. Perhaps it’s the long history, or the complex character of the city and its many Riones, or maybe it’s the sheer variety of people that call the eternal city home. Whatever it is, I’ll continue to try and capture the elusive spirit of the city that I call home, for now.

 

Seeking Green Spaces – Friday Fotos on Saturday

March 25, 2017


Every now and again, you just need to get out of the city.

Every now and again,  I crave more country than the parks of Rome can provide. Fortunately for me, skirting the border of the city is a surprising amount of beautiful farmland. The gently rolling hills of Lazio bear a closer resemblance to the famed hills of Tuscany than the fabled seven hills of Rome.

In these wide swaths of green space, you’re more likely to encounter a tractor than a Vespa, and the traffic – well, sheep may be your biggest problem here.

One overcast afternoon, we needed a break from the city. A short 15 minute drive and we were at a quaint family run Agritourismo, for a delicious organic lunch.  We remained for a while after we finished eating and let the children frolic in the green fields, just soaking in the pastoral beauty – with the Roman skyline in the distance.

Head on over to the Daily Post for more Green.

 

 

Friday Fotos: The Road Taken – The Appia Antica

March 3, 2017


In its heyday, the Appia Antica ran from the Roman Forum to Brindisi a port town on the coast of what is today Southern Puglia. Construction on the road began in 312 BC under the censor Appius Claudis Caecus and was completed in 244 BC. While much of the original 350 miles (563km) are gone, within the Parco Regionale Dell’Appia Antica remnants of the original road survive to this day.

The Appia Antica is one of my favorite places to explore. Although it is just to the south of the city, the park seems like another world, where you’re as likely to encounter sheep and horses as you are cars, bicycles and joggers.

Along the way, you’ll stumble across churches, catacombs, tombs and homes – both currently occupied and ancient ruins, like the Complesso di Massenzio. On this enormous complex, that was once the site of the emperor’s villa, you can run along the remains of a giant circus and explore the eerily silent tomb of his son Romulus.

Not far from the Complesso you’ll find one of the most recognizable symbols of the Appian Antica – the tomb of Cecelia. This tomb is thought to have been built for either the wife or daughter-in-law of Marcus Crassus, a contemporary of Julius Caesar. The tomb of Seneca, the Catacombs of San Callisto and San Sebastiano, and the spot where St Peter encountered Jesus in what is now the Church Domine quo Vadis are just a few of the incredible monuments you’ll encounter on your journey. The information center at Via Appia Antica 58/60 is very helpful and offers free maps as well as maps to purchase. You can find an interactive map on the official Appia Antica Website.

The atmosphere of the Appian Way is spectacular. You’ll find yourself transported through the ages as you stand among the same stones that the figures you’ve read about in your history books traveled on over the centuries.

I find it amazing that many of the original stones are still in the ground. In places, they are intermixed with modern cobblestones, but they remain. Etched deeply in places with continued use, but through everything, they are there still.

I have not tried to get there by public transportation, but you can visit the park by bus. The 118, 218 and 660 bus lines all have stops on the Via Appia Antica. If you wish to plan your trip by bus,  I find MouversiRoma and Google Maps to be great help when I travel by public transportation in Rome.

Stop by the DailyPost and see what others have found on their journey down the road taken.

Friday Fotos: Against the Odds

February 17, 2017


The Lipizzaner is a horse whose very survival seems against the odds. These symbolic wonders were evacuated for wars and other  turbulent times, split between the remnants of the Hapsburg Empire following World War I, taken by the Germans during World War II, and finally returned by the US Army. The end of World War II, brought with it the end of troubled times for the horses, which are beloved by many throughout the world.

Today at the Spanish Riding School, there are six recognized stallion families and 18 foundation mare families.

I was introduced to the famous horses in the 1963 film The Miracle of the White Stallion, which chronicles the movements of the horses at the end of the war, and how General Patton was involved in the return of the breeding stock to Austria following the end of World War II.

Since first watching that movie, it was my dream to see the Royal Lipizzaner Stallions, and the Spanish Riding School in Vienna.

It worked out that I did – but not in the way I expected to. The first Lipizzaner show I went to was in Poughkeepsie New York, sometime in the late ’90s. It was well before the age of the digital camera, but I do remember watching the horses perform unbelievable feats of athleticism and grace. I was spellbound. I saw them for a second time nearly 10 years later in Colorado Springs.

Another decade would pass before I had an opportunity to visit Vienna. As I sat down to plan the trip, I knew that if I did nothing else, I would see the Lipizzaners perform at the Spanish Riding School. That was the plan. What I didn’t know before that was that the horses only perform in Vienna in the Winter. I was disappointed, but I found that we could still tour the grounds and stables and watch the horses train. That sounded like an acceptable alternative. When the day of our tour finally arrived, I noticed a small sign near the ticket counter, an apology that for that week only, there would be no training either. What are the odds of that?

For more visions of things that are Against The Odds, head over to the Daily Post.

 

August marked the one year anniversary of our move from Germany to Italy. The first year was a good year, but it was not a great year. I frequently found myself feeling lost, overwhelmed, and incompetent. I should really read my own blog more. It wasn’t until someone left a comment on a post I …

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 I have just returned from making my fourth hair appointment – this year. That may not seem like a lot of haircuts to you, but I’ve seen decades through with fewer trips to the salon than that. But not here. In Italy, it’s not just my hair that’s being taken care of, it’s the relationship …

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